Innovation, the new normal?

Companies in many sectors are facing rapid change. Following Clayton Christensen’s terminology, established businesses are being disrupted by new technology, and new business models are developed around these technologies.

Whether it is 3D printing of medical implants, crowd sourcing of clinical trial data analysis, software that supports pre-clinical studies and identifies the most promising drug candidates, ‘big data’ capturing patients’ genomic profile or personalized health records that patients can carry from physician to physician, fundamental transformations are afoot in the healthcare industry.

Consultants to the healthcare sector struggle to stay on top of all the different angles that are emerging. How much reading can you do in a day? Should you rather update your skills in data mining (i.e. working with ‘big data’) or become an expert in social media platforms and the many ways they are being used by patients and physicians or study government initiatives to incorporate new technologies in reorganizing the way healthcare is delivered to the patient?

The state of confusion is pretty typical for market changes. Initially, there is a whirlwind of new ideas and approaches. Are electric cars going to be the way of the future or ceramic fuel cells? Or will biking emerge as ‘disruptive technology’ in a reorganized urban neighbourhood? Will patients carry their own health records around on a USB stick or will they become universally accessible through a (password protected) cloud? Will pharmaceutical companies find ways to make drug development cheaper or will fewer drugs be approved or will best supportive care with the bells and whistles of comfortable retirement living ‘disrupt’ the oncology pipeline? Will iOS, android or Windows 8 emerge as the dominant ecosystem for computer / tablet / phone or do we need to learn all three to know what works how in which environment? Etc, etc.

Should we wait until the dust settles before we decide how to focus our efforts?

I am not sure that the dust will ever settle. The pace of change is accelerating, with no sign of stopping or settling down. Then where should we pitch our tent? What should we hold on to? I believe that companies and individuals will succeed who develop mechanisms, routines, practices that allow them to deal with change. Not just once, but on an ongoing basis. Those who effectively survey what is going on in the whirlwind, who systematically capture their own ideas on how to ride the storm and who devise an easy process that allows them to test, develop and implement these ideas will have a chance.

Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s